General and Introductory Materials
Part 1 Introduction

Chapter d13 Tips for Online Learning

Netiquette and Clarity

Acronyms

Emoticons

Quoting

Tips for Being a Successful Learner

Writing Research Papers

Writing Self-reflection Papers

Netiquette and Clarity

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

Netiquette provides the basic information about writing online so you can be properly understood; get your point across effectively; avoid annoying someone and avoid looking like a beginner on the net.

Note: Some contractions may be appropriate in the chat rooms, where fast typing is important. Still, do they save you that much time?

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Acronyms

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

If you come across people using Acronyms you need to know what they mean. Here are some common ones. HTH.

AAMOF: As a matter of fact
BFN: Bye for now
BYKT: But you knew that
CMIIW: Correct me if I'm wrong
EOL: End of lecture
FAQ: Frequently asked questions
FITB: Fill in the blank
FWIW: For what it's worth
FYI: For your information
HTH: Hope this helps
IAC: In any case
IAE: In any event
IMCO: In my considered opinion
IMHO: In my humble opinion
IMO: In my opinion
IOW: In other words
LOL: Lots of luck or laughing out loud
MHOTY: My hat's off to you
NRN: No reply necessary
OIC: Oh, I see
OTOH: On the other hand
ROFL: Rolling on the floor laughing
RSN: Real soon now
SITD: Still in the dark
TIA: Thanks in advance
TIC: Tongue in cheek
TTYL: Talk to you later
TYVM: Thank you very much
WYSIWYG: What you see is what you get

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Emoticons

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

You'll probably come across someone using an Emoticon. Emoticons are used to compensate for the inability to convey voice inflections, facial expressions, and bodily gestures in written communication. Most emoticons will look like a face (eyes, nose and mouth). Too see these faces, while looking at the text below, tilt your head to the left, or rotate the text ninety degrees clockwise.

:) or :-) or :] or :-] or :D or :-D
Expresses happiness, sarcasm or joke

:( or :-( or :[ or :-[
Expresses unhappiness

:I or :-I
Expresses indifference

:- or :/ or :-/ or :<
Indicates undecided, confused or skeptical

:Q or :-Q
Expresses confusion

:S or :-S
Expresses incoherence or loss of words

:O or :-O
Indicates surprise, yelling or realization of an error ( "uh oh!")

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Quoting

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

Many e-mail and message-board programs let you grab the entire message that another person has written and embed it in your reply. This is known as quoting.

Avoid Me-Tooing

How many times have you seen someone place a brief comment at the end of a large quote, such as "Me too", or "I agree"? It can be quite annoying to a person who has to scroll all the way to the end of a message looking for the part that you wrote. It would make more sense to quote only a few important sentences and place a comment telling people why you agree or disagree. You can state some of the reasons why you feel the way you do, this way, you'll appear as a thoughtful person who thinks carefully about things and considers all the facts.

Avoid Stepladdering

A message that contains a quote, but inside that quote contains another quote from an earlier message and so on, is called stepladdering. A quote within a quote within a quote, can cause your reader to be confused as to what point your commenting on. Keeping your sentences short and accurate, writing on the topic, will ensure that your reply is obvious to the reader.

Alternate Between Quotes and Your Comments

Don't let bad quoting habits make your messages unclear. If a quote contained several points, selecting the whole quote and then letting your reader guess what part of the quote your commenting on, can be aggravating. Quoting effectively does require more effort than simply grabbing the entire text of what was previously written, be selective. Here are a couple of examples.

"...so I called the helpdesk but nobody would return my call"
Did you know the internet has answers to a lot computer problems? Write down the exact pop up error and search for it on the internet.

"...still, Quick Time Player is better than RealPlayer"
That really depends on what you require and prefer, don't you think?

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Tips for Being a Successful Learner

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

Learning in the online environment is clearly different from taking classes in the face-to-face classroom. Be prepared for the amount of time that online learning takes and make time for it in your week. By planning your time on a weekly basis you'll soon make time management a habit, thus less time to plan and more time for something else. You can make a daily/weekly planner, similar to the sheet below, to help you sort out all the things you need to do during the week.

Weekly Planner

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

8-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

Here are some tips and questions you can ask yourself when preparing a research paper.

The following is taken from Rena M. Paloff & Keith Pratt, The Virtual Student: A Profile and Guide to Working with Online Learners, (Jossey-Bass, 2003), p.165-69. (re-printed here with permission)

There are two types of reflection papers that you may be asked to write for a course. One could be your overall learning process in the course and the second could be on the material studied in the course.

Reflecting on Your Learning

When you are asked for an evaluation of your learning and the course, this is the opportunity for you to evaluate the process, and to provide suggestions to the instructor for course improvement. Consider the following:

Reflecting on Course Materials

The course material ideas:

© Copyright: Tom Richstatter, Franciscan Province of St. John the Baptist, Cincinnati Ohio, Order of Friars Minor. All Rights Reserved.  This page was created by Fr. Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M.  Every effort has been, and is being made, to acknowledge sources when the ideas are not my own.  Any failure to comply with the United States Copyright Act (Title 17, United States Code) will be corrected immediately should I become aware of it.  This site was updated on 04/06/13 .  Your comments on this site are welcome at webmaster2@tomrichstatter.org.