General and Introductory Materials
Part 3 Theological Issues

Chapter d34 The Holy Spirit

Preliminary Questions

Bibliography

Trinity

Christology

The Holy Spirit

To Think About

Preliminary Questions

It is the Holy Spirit who moves our hearts, turning them to God, and who opens the eyes of the mind, giving "joy and ease to everyone in assenting to the truth and believing it." To bring about an ever deeper understanding of revelation,  the same Holy Spirit constantly brings faith to completion by His gifts.  (DV 5)

Every public prayer should begin by praising God through Christ in the Holy Spirit. — Origen (De Oratione c. 33 PG XI 557 f. in Jungman 374)

No one can know the Father apart from God's Word, that is, unless the Son reveals him, and no one can know the Son unless the Father so wills. Now the Son fulfills the Father's good pleasure: the Father sends, the Son is sent, and he comes. The Father is beyond our sight and comprehension; but he is known by his Word, who tells us of him who surpasses all telling. In turn, the Father alone has knowledge of his Word. And the Lord has knowledge of the Father by his revelation of himself. Knowledge of the Father consists in the self-revelation of the Son, for all is revealed through the Word. (From the treatise Against Heresies by Saint Irenaeus, bishop. Liturgy of the Hours, Second reading, Wednesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time.)

Return to the top of this page -- Return to General and Introductory Materials Index -- Return to Fr. Tom's Home Page

Bibliography

Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation ("Dei Verbum"), November 18, 1965.  The complete text is available on the Vatican website at;   http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_const_19651118_dei-verbum_en.html

Catherine Mowry LaCugna. God For Us, 1992.

Elizabeth Johnson. Consider Jesus. , 1992.

Corbon, Jean.  The Wellspring of Worship.  Paulist Press  ISBN  0-9091-2968-X  Ne2 $12.95 -- 2003 out of print -- Used $40.00. 1988.  Excellent on the role of the Trinity and the Holy Spirit in Liturgy.  Used as a text at Mundelein Seminary. 

Archbishop Daniel E. Pilarczyk. ‘We Believe:' Essentials of Catholic Faith. St. Anthony Messenger Press, 1990.

Elizabeth Johnson, "The Incomprehensibility of God and the Image of God Male and Female," Theological Studies, 45 (1984) pp 441-465.

Catherine Mowry LaCugna, "Making the Most of Trinity Sunday," Worship 60:3 (May 1986) pp 210-224.

Gail Ramshaw-schmidt. "Naming the Trinity: Orthodoxy and Inclusivity", Worship 60:6 (November 1986) pp 491-498.

Catherine Mowry LaCugna, "Living Trinitarian Faith," in Systematic Theology Vol I by Fiorenza and Galvin Editors, Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1991.

F. J. Sheed. The Holy Spirit in Action: Why Christians Call Him "The Lord and Giver of Life.", Ann Arbor, Michigan: Servant Books, 1981. ISBN 0-89283-109-X. Paper $3.95.

Theological-Historical Commission for the Great Jubilee of the Year 2000. The Holy Spirit, Lord and Giver of Life. Cross Roads herder book, 1998 ISBN Paper

Kilian McDonnel, O.S.B. and George T. Montague, S.M. Fanning the Flame (Christian Initiation and Baptism in the Holy Spirit) Collegeville: The Liturgical Press. Paper $1.95.

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. The Holy Spirit in Luke. St. Anthony Messenger press. Cassette Tapes - Order # A7020

Fr. Raymond E. Brown, S.S. The Paraclete:  Spirit's Gift to the Church. Welcome Recordings

Athanasius, Saint " Lettres a Sérapion sur la divinité du Saint-Esprit",   Saint Meinrad Archabbey Library BQ 310 .S6 v.15

La Potterie, Ignace de, The Christian lives by the Spirit,   by Ignace de la Potterie and Stanislaus Lyonnet. Pref. by Yves Congar. [Translated by John Morriss]  For your Theology of Ministry course I would urge your reading the Appendix "The Origin and Basic Meaning of the Word 'Lay" " pages 267-284 (written by Ignace de la Potterie, S.J.)   The short Preface (pp. v-ix) by YvesCongar is worth a read also.  I love the Orthodox criticism that Vatican II failed to provide a theology of the Holy Spirit and an anthropology (page ix). [Jerry]

Return to the top of this page -- Return to General and Introductory Materials Index -- Return to Fr. Tom's Home Page

Trinity

Christology

The Holy Spirit

To Think About

Today Trinitarian theology is being recovered as a fruitful and intelligible way to articulate what it means to be "saved by God through Christ in the Power of the Holy spirit." — Catherine Mowry LaCugna (article page 153)

Every public prayer should begin by praising God through Christ in the Holy Spirit. — Origen (De Oratione c. 33 PG XI 557 f. in Jungman 374)

If then you are the body of Christ and his members, it is your sacrament that reposes on the altar of the Lord.... Be what you see and receive what you are." (St. Augustine, sermon 272) "There you are on the table, and there you are in the chalice...." (St. Augustine, sermon 229)

The Church's experience of Jesus teaches us that in God is community, that God is source, that God is knowledge, that God is love. — Archbishop Pilarczyk

The triune God was part of the apostles' experience with Jesus and was at the center of their preaching. But only after several centuries of reflection did the Church evolve theological formulation about the Trinity. This formulation can be summarized in a few worlds: God is one; and in God are one divine nature and three divine Persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Son proceeds from Father, and Spirit from Father and Son. — Archbishop Pilarczyk

No one can know the Father apart from God's Word, that is, unless the Son reveals him, and no one can know the Son unless the Father so wills. Now the Son fulfills the Father's good pleasure: the Father sends, the Son is sent, and he comes. The Father is beyond our sight and comprehension; but he is known by his Word, who tells us of him who surpasses all telling. In turn, the Father alone has knowledge of his Word. And the Lord has knowledge of the Father by his revelation of himself. Knowledge of the Father consists in the self-revelation of the Son, for all is revealed through the Word. (From the treatise Against Heresies by Saint Irenaeus, bishop. Liturgy of the Hours, Second reading, Wednesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time.)

The almighty and most holy Word of the Father pervades the whole of reality, everywhere unfolding his power and shining on all things visible and invisible. He sustains it all and binds it together in himself. He leaves nothing devoid of his power but gives life and keeps it in being throughout all of creation and in each individual creature. (From a Discourse Against the Pagans by Saint Athanasius, bishop. Liturgy of the Hours, Second reading, Thursday of the First Week in Ordinary Time.)

"The Church's experience of Jesus teaches us that in God is community...." Archbishop Daniel E. Pilarczyk

In the theology and liturgy of Western Christianity, the active role of the Holy Spirit is underappreciated. Some of the problem, no doubt, is that, for those Christians whose Sacrament of Confirmation took place years after their baptism into the church, there is an inclination to regard the presence of the Holy Spirit as an "add-on," as not necessary to the life of God as experienced in Christian life. Yet the readings proclaimed in Advent alert believers to the role of the Holy Spirit in the incarnation of God in Jesus of Nazareth and in the life of the church today. ... The theological tradition is constant in teachings that – as the Holy Spirit worked in the incarnation of the Son, in the Son taking on flesh – so does the Holy Spirit work in the body of Christ of the church and its sacraments, knitting together sinful individuals and raising from them the sinless people of God. The community of faith wrought by the power of the Holy Spirit, as was the body of Jesus knit together in Mary's womb two millennia ago.  I believe the point is this: Does speaking of Confirmation as the "Sacrament of the Holy Spirit" lead people to think that Confirmation is the ONLY "Sacrament of the Holy Spirit" and cause them to overlook the fact that it is only by the Holy Spirit received in Baptism that we become members of Christ's Body, the Church; and it is only by the Holy Spirit, received at every Eucharist that enables us who "eat the one Bread to become Christ's Body" – the principal petition at every Eucharist?  (Martin Connell, Eternity Today, (Vol 2, page 75)

Return to the top of this page -- Return to General and Introductory Materials Index -- Return to Fr. Tom's Home Page

© Copyright: Tom Richstatter, Franciscan Province of St. John the Baptist, Cincinnati Ohio, Order of Friars Minor. All Rights Reserved.  This page was created by Fr. Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M.  Every effort has been, and is being made, to acknowledge sources when the ideas are not my own.  Any failure to comply with the United States Copyright Act (Title 17, United States Code) will be corrected immediately should I become aware of it.  This site was updated on 06/10/15 .  Your comments on this site are welcome at tomrichs@psci.net.