Marriage
Part 4 Theology

Chapter 42 Theology of Marriage

Preliminary Questions

Bibliography

Definition of Marriage

Theology

To Think About

Preliminary Questions

How would you define Marriage?  What are the sources for your definition?  What is the difference between a sacramental marriage and a non-sacramental marriage? 

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Bibliography

An excellent bibliography on the Sacrament of Marriage by Joseph Martos can be found at www.liguori.org/books/doorsbib.htm  Chapter XI Marriage

Michael G. Lawler.  Marriage and the Catholic Church.  A Michael Glazier Book.  The Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN, 2002.  ISBN 0-8146-5116-X

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Definition of Marriage

1.  Importance of a definition (words: their reception, meaning, and prehensions).

1. Hot chocolate
2. Catechism -- see the USCCB Catechism Access Guide
3. WC = Wayside Chapel?
4. To travel (English /German)
5.  Marriage / Wedding

2.  Code of Canon Law (1917) Book III: Of Things. Part I: Of the Sacraments. Title VII: Of Marriage. (Canons 1012 to 1143. 132 canons. The translation used here is taken from A Practical Commentary on the Code of Canon Law by Rev. Stanislaus Woywod, which was a standard textbook for seminaries in the USA before the publication of the 1993 code.)

Canon 1012. Christ our Lord raised the actual marriage contract between baptized persons to the dignity of a sacrament. Wherefore, there can be no valid matrimonial contract between baptized persons which is not also necessarily a sacrament.

Canon 1013. The primary purpose of marriage is the procreation and education of children. The secondary purpose is to furnish mutual aid and a remedy for concupiscence. The essential characteristics of marriage are its unity and indissolubility, which obtain a special stability in Christian marriage by virtue of the sacrament.

3.  Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World  Gaudium et spes December 7, 1965

4.  Code of Canon Law (1983) Book IV The Sanctifying Function of the Church. Part I: The Sacraments. Title VII: Marriage. (Canons 1055 to 1165. 111 canons. The translation used here is that of the Latin-English Edition, New English Translation, Prepared under the auspices of the Canon Law Society of America, 1998.)

Canon 1055 § 1. The marriage covenant by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life and which is ordered by its nature to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring, has been raised by Christ the Lord to the dignity of a sacrament between the baptized. For this reason, a valid matrimonial contract cannot exist between the baptized without it being by that fact a sacrament. (Note the footnotes given in the Code, especially the references to the Second Vatican Council LG 11, 41, GS 48, and subsequent statements by the Popes Paul VI and John Paul II.)

5.  Catechism of the Catholic Church 1994 (Second Edition 1997). Part Two: The Celebration of the Christian Mystery. Section Two2: The Seven Sacraments of the Church. Chapter Three: The Sacraments at the Service of Communion. Article 7: The Sacrament of Matrimony (pp 400-415, #1601-1666. The translation used here is taken from the internet, Copyright © by United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, November 24, 2002)

1601. The matrimonial covenant, by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life, is by its nature ordered toward the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring; this covenant between baptized persons has been raised by Christ the Lord to the dignity of a sacrament.

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Theology

1.  Note the place the text occurs in each document.

2.  Note the language of contract and covenant.

3.  Note the "ends" of marriage.

4.  Note the paradigm shift.

5.  Lawler (Marriage and the Catholic Church, pp viii-ix) states:  "This change of perspective on marriage is not without consequences.  The consequences of the analogue model, procreative institution, which are mainly biological and act-focused, are different from the consequences of the analogue model, interpersonal union, which are mainly interpersonal and union-focused.  So far though there have been contemporary adjustments in the Catholic theology and law of marriage, there has been little official systematic reflection on those different consequences."   He wrote Marriage and the Catholic Church in order to explore those consequences.

6.  "Christianity does not give married love its value;  rather it celebrates the deeper meaning of married love that can sometimes be lost or obscured in the hectic pace of life.  Christianity gives us insight, vision into what is ordinarily invisible."  (Whitehead, "Spirituality and Lifestyle,"  in Kieran Scott and Michael Warren. Perspectives on Marriage: A Reader,  p 412).   A sacrament is a visible sign of invisible grace.  The Sacrament of Marriage "gives us insight, vision into what is ordinarily invisible."   What are some of these "invisible" realities:

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To Think About

 

 

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© Copyright: Tom Richstatter, Franciscan Province of St. John the Baptist, Cincinnati Ohio, Order of Friars Minor. All Rights Reserved.  This page was created by Fr. Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M.  Every effort has been, and is being made, to acknowledge sources when the ideas are not my own.  Any failure to comply with the United States Copyright Act (Title 17, United States Code) will be corrected immediately should I become aware of it.  This site was updated on 03/08/10 .  Your comments on this site are welcome at tomrichs@psci.net.