Sacraments of Initiation
Part 9 Conclusions

Chapter i91 Baptismal Spirituality

Preliminary Questions

Bibliography

Theology

To Think About

Preliminary Questions

What is spirituality? How does Christian spirituality differ from that of then millennials who say that they are "spiritual" but not "religious"?

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Bibliography

Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life. Jossey-Bass, 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0470907757

Dalai Lama, The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality. Random House, ASIN: B000FCKCZQ

Jean-Pierre Torrell, Priestly People, A: Baptismal Priesthood and Priestly Ministry Paperback, Paulist Press (May 1, 2013) ISBN-13: 978-0809148158

Esther de Waal, Seeking Life: The Baptismal Invitation of the Rule of St. Benedict. Liturgical Press (May 1, 2009) ISBN-13: 978-0814618806

C. S. Lewis, The Four Loves, A Harvest Book. Mariner Books (September 29, 1971) ISBN: 0151329168

Louis Weil, Drenched in Grace: Essays in Baptismal Ecclesiology Inspired by the Work and Ministry. Lizette Larson-Miller (Editor), Walter Knowles (Editor). Pickwick Publications (June 26, 2013) ASIN: B00EHILEA6  ---  [One of the pioneers in exploring this theological issue in the United States has been the Rev. Dr. Louis Weil, who, {a fellow graduate with a doctorate in liturgy from the Institut superiour de liturgie in Paris France} from the time he helped author the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, has advocated for an approach called “baptismal ecclesiology.” In a number of essays since the 1980s, Dr. Weil has encouraged an increasingly ecumenical conversation around this particular approach to ecclesiology. This ecumenical collection of essays by a distinguished and international group of sixteen scholars continues the conversation on liturgy and ecclesiology begun by Fr. Weil.]

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Theology

Baptismal Spirituality is the praxis and process of personal transformation, in accordance with Christian religious ideals, oriented to growth in holiness, brought about by living out the biblical metaphors for Baptism in one’s day to day life.

What I was asking for in this assignment was that you would describe how the biblical metaphors for Christian baptism influence your day to day life decisions so as to foster the coming of the kingdom (Christ the Omega) and your own personal growth and holiness. It is “where the rubber meets the road” to use the words of Fr. Adrian Burke, OSB; is where the “rubber” of theology, prayer, and mysticism meet the “road” of daily living.

How do the following metaphors (see:  The Sacrament of Baptism in the New Testament) influence your daily living?

1)  Death and Resurrection

Death to sarx; rising in Pnuma

2)  New Birth 

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3.  Enlightenment

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4.  Being clothed in Christ.  Puting on Christ as a garment.  Taking off the old self and putting on the new Being clothed in the righteousness of Christ

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5.  Initiation into the Christian community

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6.  The forgiveness of sins

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7.  The gift of the Holy Spirit, Being anointed and/or sealed by the Holy Spirit

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8.  Washing, sanctification, justification 

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9.  Being sealed or marked as belonging to God and God's people 

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10.  Being grafted onto the vine which is Jesus

It is now Christ's life that flows through me. Daily tasks of compassion and generosity that would be impossible for me to do on my own, are now possible because it is Christ's strength that flows through me as I have been grafted onto that root. "I can do all things in the one who strengthens me." 

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To Think About

How is biblical spirituality affected when it is based only on one metaphor (often "being born again") rather than based on a more comprehensive understanding of the New Testament metaphors?

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Copyright: Tom Richstatter, Franciscan Province of St. John the Baptist, Cincinnati Ohio, Order of Friars Minor. All Rights Reserved.  This page was created by Fr. Thomas Richstatter, O.F.M.  Every effort has been, and is being made, to acknowledge sources when the ideas are not my own.  Any failure to comply with the United States Copyright Act (Title 17, United States Code) will be corrected immediately should I become aware of it.  This site was updated on 05/05/15 .  Your comments on this site are welcome at trichstatter@franciscan.org